Academy Treasures

Tag: Academy Treasures
With World War II over, Rosalind Russell makes a plea to the theater-going public to consider buying war bonds to help support disabled veterans. Preserved from the Academy Film Archive’s War Film Collection, one of the largest collections of World War II era short films held outside government archives.In 1973, Russell received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.
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Composer Jerry Goldsmith possessed a unique gift of being able to write music to emotionally support a film and to convey musically the inexpressible and unseen. His Oscar-nominated, landmark score for the 1970 film Patton brilliantly illustrates this with its unexpected and memorable use of two trumpets that play a three-note pattern that is manipulated to intentionally add delay to the notes. To do this, Goldsmith employed an Echoplex, a custom-built recorder that used magnetic recording tape and exploited the distance between the recording and playback heads to create a tape delay, or echo...
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In honor of our upcoming of screening of Federico Fellini’s Oscar-winning Amarcord, which will be shown as part of “Passing Beauty: A Conversation with Hou Hsiao-hsien” on October 13th, we thought we’d share some little-seen images of the Italian auteur throughout his career.  All the photos are courtesy the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library.  [[{"fid":"61211","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Fellini%2C%20back%20in%20the%20early%201940s%2C%20as%20he%20was%20transitioning%...
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We heard a rumor the other day that made us laugh. Someone said that Margaret Herrick was just a secretary who happened to stumble into a cushy job at the Academy in 1943. Nothing could be further from the truth. As so often happens with women who have established successful careers, Mrs. Herrick is rarely given full credit for how she built her career or for her many accomplishments.Margaret Herrick remains among the lesser-known of cinema’s earliest champions, despite her recognizing the need for a film study collection in Los Angeles and single-handedly laying the foundation for the...
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With a choice of delightful images like “the jumping monkey” and “the ball tosser,” who wouldn’t want to make their own moving picture machine? At the turn of the last century, subscribers to the Los Angeles Sunday Examiner had the opportunity to make their own zoetrope, or moving picture machine, by cutting out and assembling the newspaper’s inserted supplement, seen below.[[{"fid":"60626","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][format]":"embedded_html...
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In conjunction with this year’s much-discussed Telluride Film Festival, we take a look back at the sixth annual festival, which was held in 1979.In this excerpt, noted filmmaker Werner Herzog, already a Telluride favorite, lingers with a small crowd after a mountaintop panel discussion. Herzog shares his thoughts about the fearlessness of war reporters who step into harm’s way because they feel sheltered behind their cameras. To help demonstrate his point, Herzog, who often filmed under challenging circumstances, trades places with the cameraman.Can anyone help identify the gentleman Herzog...
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“Thank you both so much for that fantastic experience,” wrote historian and filmmaker Kevin Brownlow to Bill and Stella Pence after the 8th Telluride Film Festival in 1981. When festival attendees enthuse over the event, it is frequently in reverent, semi-religious tones, and the word “experience” is invoked more often than not, facts immediately apparent in the clippings, correspondence and other documents contained in the Telluride Film Festival records, which were recently cataloged for Special Collections at the Margaret Herrick Library.Brownlow was evidently still stunned by what perhaps...
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As we near the end of summer, let's take a look at some Southern California beaches, roughly 90 years ago. Recently rediscovered at the Academy Film Archive, this gorgeous silent footage includes aerial shots of Newport Beach, Huntington Beach, Balboa Island, and Laguna Beach. The tinted imagery showcases seaside cliffs, orange groves, families at the beach, oil fields peppering Huntington Beach, and boats exploring Newport Beach’s harbor.Produced by Herman Fowler around 1925, the film appears to be part of a short documentary series titled Know Your Own Country, which profiled the landscape...
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This whimsical illustration from the 1921 film, The Education of Elizabeth, perfectly fits the image of silent film star Billie Burke. Although she came to prominence on the stages of London and New York, Burke first appeared on screen in 1916 and is perhaps best known for her role as Glinda in The Wizard of Oz (1939). The same appeal that she brought to that character is evident in this charming print, which depicts Burke at the height of her career. Burke was a fan favorite in part because of her stylish dress sense, which is seen here to great advantage.[[{"fid":"59666","view_mode":"...
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In celebration of the 100th-anniversary of Technicolor, we present this rare City Beneath the Sea trailer from 1953, courtesy of the Packard Humanities Institute Collection at the Academy Film Archive. This historically notable acquisition is the largest known collection of motion picture trailers on film and contains over 60,000 items.This Wednesday on July 29th, join us for a unique opportunity to experience vintage 35mm gems at the Museum of Modern Art as archivist Cassie Blake presents a one-of-a-kind trailer show curated from the Academy Film Archive’s vast Technicolor holdings. Focusing...
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